The Determine
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A Corcentric Company.

June 7, 2018

Three reasons to measure procurement ROI (and one simple way to do it).

Three reasons to measure procurement ROI (and one simple way to do it).

A DEC representative once pointed out how the terms “conservation” and “efficiency” are often (wrongly) used interchangeably. The first means doing with less, the second means optimizing what’s available. Obviously, efficiency is a better way to go. The same can be said of procurement; instead of just trying to cut spend constantly, isn’t it better to manage that spend more efficiently (through P2P automation, for instance)? [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”#ProcurementROI”]The result of a more stringent approach to spend management may very well be a noticeable, if not significant, increase in procurement ROI[/inlinetweet]. We’ll show you a simple way to run those numbers.

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April 10, 2018

Customer success through change management.

Customer success through change management.

[inlinetweet prefix=”@Determine” tweeter=”” suffix=”#ChangeManagement”]True organizational transformation is about helping people change the way they do things.[/inlinetweet]

“You don’t have to do anything but die.”

This rather blunt, but deceptively motivational statement was a frequent response from my high school coach whenever we felt too apathetic towards some practice drills or other. Do we we have to do sprints in the rain? Do we have to come in on Saturday? Do we have to… etc, etc. It was an effective motivator because the underlying message touched a competitive nerve: No, you don’t have to do anything, as long as you’re okay with failing miserably in front of a crowd of friends, parents, spectators and the opposing team. As a change management strategy, it turned a bunch of talented-but-unmotivated athletes into a winning team. Clever man, our coach.

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April 3, 2018

From Customer Success to Customer Advocacy

From Customer Success to Customer Advocacy

[inlinetweet prefix=”@Determine” tweeter=”” suffix=”#CustomerAdvocacy”]Customer advocacy isn’t an event or a milestone: it is a natural progression that predates implementation.[/inlinetweet]

Just weeks after joining the Determine team as their Senior Vice President of Customer Success, Kevin Turner was in attendance at the annual user group conference in Laguna Beach. Between meeting customers for the first time and hearing their feedback through presentations and informal exchanges, it was a critical and well timed opportunity to ensure that the Determine product roadmap is aligned with a broad range of definitions for customer success.

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March 27, 2018

Customer Success Part 2: Establishing a Framework for Customer Success Management.

Customer Success Part 2: Establishing a Framework for Customer Success Management.

For strategic procurement, customer success metrics are measured in two categories: efficiency and effectiveness.

As I mentioned in Part 1 of this series — Do you have a strategic relationship with your technology provider? — I recently joined Determine as Senior Vice President of Customer Success. On March 14 we held our West Region User Group in Laguna Beach, which brought together valued customers to share their experiences, feedback and ideas about our solutions and Determine as a company. [inlinetweet prefix=”@Determine” tweeter=”” suffix=”#procurement”]That openness and reinforcing of trust are critical components to establishing a sustainable Customer Success Management program[/inlinetweet].

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March 6, 2018

Customer Success Part 1: Do you have a strategic relationship with your technology provider?

Customer Success Part 1: Do you have a strategic relationship with your technology provider?

I recently joined Determine as their Senior Vice President of Customer Success, but it is not a new role for me. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@Determine” suffix=”#procurement”]One of the primary things I work on with companies is the need to tell their success stories[/inlinetweet], whether internally or externally. Believe it or not, the reasons for doing this – regardless of the intended audience – aren’t as different as you might think.

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